GradStudents Discussing in Workshop

Programs

Graduate Student and Postdoc Workshops

Synopsis

Hands-on, evidence-based workshops on effective teaching practices for grad students and postdocs.

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Graduate Student and Postdoc Workshops

Workshops draw on the most recent educational research and are facilitated by professional Center for Teaching and Learning staff. Workshops are 90-minutes in length and they focus on a range of foundational topics and advanced-level topics which will help graduate students and postdocs building their teaching knowledge. These workshops are offered throughout the academic year on both the Danforth and Medical campuses.

Foundations in Teaching Workshops

The Center for Teaching and Learning provides Foundations in Teaching (FIT) workshops that are designed to introduce participants to evidence-based teaching strategies that are applicable across varied disciplines and teaching contexts. These workshops allow participants to begin to engage with current research and best practices in teaching and learning through a student-centered and highly active workshop design. Participants who attend FIT workshops gain exposure to important vocabulary, concepts from educational research, and strategies for implementing effective teaching practices. Workshops cover a variety of topics relevant to teaching in all disciplines including: providing effective feedback, increasing student participation, and negotiating your authority in the classroom.

Foundational-Level Workshop Goals

In every workshop, our staff will:

  1. Introduce graduate students and postdocs to evidence-based teaching strategies that are fundamental for effective teaching across disciplines and course contexts.
  2. Model strategies for facilitating effective collaboration, promoting active learning, and developing inclusive classroom practices.
  3. Display a growth mindset.
  4. Encourage participation in the process of reflective teaching.

In every workshop, participants will:

  1. Learn about foundational concepts in educational pedagogy and develop strategies for encouraging student participation, engaging in inclusive teaching practices, and establishing effective classroom management.
  2. Consider the benefits of developing reflective teaching habits, and begin implementing reflective strategies in regards to their own teaching contexts.
  3. Recognize teaching as broadly encompassing many experiences they will have as graduate students and postdocs (e.g. research mentorship, tutoring, traditional classroom teaching, presentations).

Sample Foundations in Teaching Workshop Topics:

  • Pedagogy 101
  • Providing Verbal Feedback
  • Teaching to a Diverse Student Population
  • Increasing Student Participation
  • Teaching in an American Classroom
  • Who’s In Charge Here?: Negotiating Authority in the Classroom

Advanced-Level Workshops

The Center for Teaching and Learning also offers interactive, advanced-level workshops that build on the foundational knowledge gained through the FIT workshops. Advanced-level workshops introduce participants to research findings on student learning from the cognitive and learning sciences, the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), and discipline-based pedagogical research. They cover a wide variety of topics including: inclusive teaching practices, active learning, critical reading skills, collaborative learning, designing course materials and assessments, and composing teaching-related job market materials.

Advanced registration is required for all workshops. Registration opens approximately two weeks prior to the date of the workshop. For more information on upcoming workshops or to register for a workshop, please visit the events page.

The Center for Teaching and Learning also offers interactive, advanced-level workshops that build on the foundational knowledge gained through the FIT workshops. Advanced-level workshops introduce participants to research findings on student learning from the cognitive and learning sciences, the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), and discipline-based pedagogical research. They cover a wide variety of topics including: inclusive teaching practices, active learning, critical reading skills, collaborative learning, designing course materials and assessments, and composing teaching-related job market materials.

Advanced-level workshops are suitable for those who are currently teaching or have taught as part of their graduate training or professional program. Typically, graduate students in their third year and beyond begin taking advanced-level workshops. These workshops fulfill requirements for the Professional Development in Teaching Program.

The three advanced-level workshop series include: STEM Pedagogies; Pedagogies in the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences; and Job Market Series.

STEM series and Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences Series Workshop Goals

In every STEM or Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences series workshop, Center for Teaching and Learning staff will:

  1. Introduce graduate students and postdocs to evidence-based teaching strategies that are fundamental for effective teaching across disciplines and course contexts.
  2. Model strategies for facilitating effective collaboration, promoting active learning, and developing inclusive classroom practices.
  3. Display a growth mindset.
  4. Encourage participation in the process of reflective teaching.

In every STEM series or Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences series workshop, participants will  build on what they’ve learned from FIT workshops as well as:

  1. Practice applying evidence-based teaching strategies from SoTL or disciplinary research to common instructional contexts in their respective disciplines.
  2. Explore strategies for facilitating effective collaboration, promoting active learning, engaging students in metacognitive practice, and developing an inclusive classroom climate.
  3. Refine reflective teaching habits, and begin implementing reflective strategies for learning through feedback in their teaching.

Sample STEM or Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Series Workshop Topics

STEM Workshops:

  • Applying Cognitive Science to Improve Teaching
  • Classroom Assessment Techniques
  • Introduction to Problem-Based and Case-Based Learning
  • Introduction to Team-Based Learning
  • Mentoring Undergraduate Research

Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences Workshops:

  • Designing Effective Writing Assignments
  • Facilitating Challenging Conversations
  • Facilitating Engaging Discussions
  • Fostering an Inclusive Classroom Climate
  • Responding to Student Writing

Workshops offered in both series:

  • Constructing Effective Collaborative Learning Opportunities
  • Developing Students’ Disciplinary Critical Reading Skills
  • Developing Effective Summative Assessments
  • Incorporating Active Learning During Lectures
  • Introduction to Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

Job Market Series Workshop Goals

In every Job Market series workshop, Center for Teaching and Learning staff will:

  1. Define common features of teaching-related job market materials and/or activities.
  2. Offer strategies for effectively documenting past and current teaching experiences in terms of future career goals.
  3. Provide suggestions for discussing past and current teaching experiences in terms of future career goals.

In every Job Market series workshop, participants will:

  1. Investigate common features of teaching-related job market materials and/or activities.
  2. Explore strategies for effectively documenting past and current teaching in terms of future career goals.
  3. Practice discussing and writing about past and current teaching experience in terms of future career goals.

Sample Job Market Workshop Topics

  • Writing a Teaching Philosophy Statement
  • Addressing Inclusion and Diversity in Job Market Materials
  • Preparing and Delivering a Teaching Demonstration
  • Creating a Teaching Portfolio

STEM Pedagogies Workshop Series

The Center for Teaching and Learning’s STEM Pedagogies Workshop Series was designed in response to calls for improving STEM undergraduate education (e.g., Olson & Riordan, 2012) by training future faculty in evidence-based teaching.

The STEM Pedagogy Workshop Series integrates research, practice, and reflection:

  • Research—Student-centered learning is a knowledge-building process that requires active engagement with the content, collaboration with peers, and reflection on meaning and application. The STEM Pedagogies Workshops introduce participants to research findings on student learning from the cognitive and learning sciences, the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) and discipline-based education research.
  • Practice—Evidence-based pedagogies greatly enhance student learning, when implemented correctly (Anderson et al., 2001). Workshop participants experience, first-hand, active-learning pedagogies with experienced facilitators and then engage in a discussion on how research data from the learning and cognitive sciences can be translated into effective teaching practices (Fisher et al., 2013).
  • Reflection—Transforming workshop participants into reflective, scholarly teachers is at the heart of what we do. The STEM workshop participants test their own knowledge before and after workshops via clicker questions and are asked to reflect on how the topic applies to their own classroom teaching through a post-workshop writing exercise.

STEM Pedagogies workshops are offered every Fall and Spring semester.

Core Topics

  • Applying Cognitive Science to Improve Teaching
  • Structuring and Teaching Introductory STEM Courses
  • Developing a Scholarly Approach to Teaching (or Introduction to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning)
  • Inclusive Teaching in STEM
  • Structuring Opportunities for Active Learning during Lectures

Elective Topics

Any STEM Pedagogies workshop that is not one of the Core Topics indicated above is identified as an Elective Topic. Example elective workshop titles can be found below.

  • Collaborative Learning: Philosophy and Implementation
  • Collaborative Learning: Designing Materials
  • Designing Materials for Inquiry-Based Laboratories
  • Inquiry-Based Laboratory Teaching: Philosophy and Implementation
  • Mentoring Undergraduate Research
  • Peer-Led Team Learning: Philosophy and Implementation
  • Problem-Based and Case-Based Learning: Philosophy and Implementation
  • Problem-Based and Case-Based Learning: Designing Materials
  • Process-Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL)
  • Teaching Students How to Critically Evaluate Scientific Literature

Evaluation of these workshops is being supported by a National Science Foundation grant.

References

Anderson L., Karthwohl D., Airaian, P., Cruikshank K., Mayer R., Pintrich, P., Raths, J., & Wittrock, M. (Eds.). (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing. New York: Longman

Fisher, B. A., Dufault, C. L., Repice, M. D., and Frey, R. F. (2013). Fostering a ‘growth mindset’: Integrating research on teaching and learning and the practice of teaching. To Improve the Academy, (32). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2013. 39-56.

Olson, S., & Riordan, D. G. (2012). Engage to Excel: Producing One Million Additional College Graduates with Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Executive Office of the President.

Advanced registration is required for all workshops. Registration opens approximately two weeks prior to the date of the workshop. For more information on upcoming workshops or to register for a workshop, please visit the Events page.